Eurasian Golden Oriole

One of the most shy birds  I ever saw.

 Eurasian Golden Oriole (Oriolus oriolus)

The name “oriole” was first used in the 18th century and is an adaptation of the scientific Latin genus name, which is derived from the Classical Latin “aureolus” meaning golden. Various forms of “oriole” have existed in Roman languages since the 12th and 13th centuries.

Their call is a screech like a jay, but the song is a beautiful fluting weela-wee-ooo or or-iii-ole, unmistakable once heard.

They feed on insects and fruit. They build neat nests in tree forks and lay 3-6 eggs.

The male is striking in the typical oriole black and yellow plumage, but the female is a drabber green bird. Orioles are shy, and even the male is remarkably difficult to see in the dappled yellow and green leaves of the canopy. In flight they look somewhat like a thrush, strong and direct with some shallow dips over longer distances.

The breeding range of this species spans from Portugal, Spain and France across the United Kingdom and Scandinavia to Poland, Russia, the Balkans, Turkey and West Asia to the Caucasus up to Mongolia and China. They winter in central and southern Africa. They generally migrate during the night, but may travel during the day in the spring migration.

In Western Europe they prefer open broadleaf forests and plantations, copses, riverine forest, orchards, large gardens; in Eastern Europe they may inhabit more continuous forest as well as mixed or coniferous forests. They generally avoid treeless habitats but may forage there. In their wintering habitat they are fond in semi-arid to humid woodland, tall forests, riverine forest, woodland/savanna mosaic and savanna.

(Text from  Wikipedia)

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8 thoughts on “Eurasian Golden Oriole”

  1. I’ve never had the luck to see one. I’ve heard the a lot when I’ve been on holiday in Europe, but as to getting a pair of binoculars on one – nope. As you say, their song is quite distinctive – almost ‘tropical’.

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